Rupin Pass Trek

“Great things are done when men and mountains meet.” 

Wouldn’t you want to explore through the naked eye the spine-tingling beauty of Uttarakhand, captured in the famous Heinrich Harrer-thriller, Seven Years in Tibet (1997)? Complete eight days of hardcore trekking among the dense forests, thickets of snow meadows and the serenity of the alluring Himalayan villages. The Great Himalayan ranges, known for their surreal beauty, offer a great getaway, a ride through the Edenic Paradise of the Rupin Pass.

Source: Flickr 

The Panoramic Scenic Beauty of the Pass

Rupin Pass Trek is one of the most endorsed and handpicked Himalayan trek getaway for winters (September to October) as well as summer trek (May-June). This crossover and high-altitude trek captures the most scenic views of the three-staged waterfall of the Rupin River, lush-green forests and snowy meadows glacial meadows. Set at an altitude of 15,250 feet, the adventure route starts from Dhaula in Uttarakhand and ends in Sangla in Himachal Pradesh. It is a moderate-difficulty trek of many high and lows. It requires a well-maintained fitness level, lung power and endurance all-through.

Source; Hrishikesh Baruah 

Trek Itinerary

The Rupin Pass Trek is an exemplary expedition for all venturing nature-lovers. As is said, “Variety is the spice of life”, this is exactly what the Rupin Pass trail has to offer, with multiferous mural-like beauty of the mountains. The trail is a rugged one, with slipper green cliffs as well as pristine snow peaks. The adventure trip starts from Dehradun (Uttarakhand) and ends in Shimla (Himachal Pradesh), covering approximately 52 kms in 8 days of trekking in a moderately difficult terrain.

Source: Rupinpassblog@wordpress.com

Day 1 – Dehradun to Dhaula (5,100ft) via cab, approx. 11 hours

 Day 2– Dhaula to Sewa (6,300 ft),11 km in 6hours

Source: Hrishikesh Baruah 

Day 3 – Sewa to Jiskun (7,700ft), 9 km 6 hours

Day 4 – Jiskun to Uduknal (10,100ft), 6 km in 5 hours

Day 5 – Uduknal to Dhanderas (11,700ft), 6 km in 5 hours.

Source: Hrishikesh Baruah 

Day 6 – Dhandera to Upper Water Fall Camp (13,000ft), 3 hours

Source: Hrishikesh Baruah 

Day 7– Rupin Pass (15,380ft) and back to Ronti Gad (13,100ft), 11 hours

Day 8– Ronti Gad to Sangla (8,600ft) and back to Shimla.

Mobile networks are available throughout Dhaula, Jiskun and Sangla. However, do caution your loved ones about poor connectivity in most parts of the trek.

Trek Guide

The trek- batch size is generally 18-20 members. All live in tents, with  3 members per tent. Mountaineering and cooking helpers will be available.

Source: Flickr 

Things to carry along:

  1. Important Documents like govt. photo-ID and Medical certificate.
  2. 3-4 warm layers and thermals, raincoat, good trekking shoes, socks and scarves.
  3. Sunglasses, sun-cap, snow-gloves, small and easy-to-carry backpack.
  4. Trekking pole and LED torch are a must.
  5. Toiletries like sun-block, wet-wipes, etc.
  6. Cutlery like spoons, mugs and water-bottle.
  7. Extra zip-locks and plastic covers.
  8. Medicines.

Fitness

The Rupin Pass Trek is a high-altitude trek of about 15,350 feet. This moderately difficult cross-over trek is mostly suitable for individuals with a well-defined fitness regime, all above 12 years of age. One should be psychologically and physically ready to trek 5-6 hours or approx. 10 kms per day, comprising of ascents and descents through a rugged and slippery terrain. It is advisable for debutants to enroll into a mountain-climbing course before starting the trek experience. During the trek, remember to keep yourself hydrated in order to avoid banal altitude sickness.  

Similar Treks

If you have relished the Rupin Pass Trek, you could luxuriate the Pin Parvati Pass trek and the Everest Base Camp Trek. Having completed all these treks would make you the master of the Trek game. Also read the blog for a first-hand experience, https://hrishikeshbaruah.wordpress.com/2015/10/25/a-slice-of-heaven-my-autumn-trek-to-rupin-pass/

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